Resources – Shirley’s Articles For Reprint

Free Online Training in
Speaking Clearly and Confidently

(and scroll down for a fun quiz on word stress)

Writing clearly and concisely is one thing, but speaking clearly is another – and from all my experience training people in communication and business writing skills, I know that many people also need help in speaking English more clearly, confidently and correctly. Did you know that if you improve your speaking, you will also improve your writing?!

Do you have difficulty pronouncing words like: calendar, colleague, pronunciation, purchase, and many more? Do you long for more confidence to speak up in front of colleagues, clients, in meetings, even with friends? If so, you will want to sign up for this fabulous FREE online training from my friend Heather Hansen.

Don’t let lack of confidence in speaking English hold you back any longer. This is an amazing offer from my good friend and Global English expert, Heather Hansen. She is offering free online training to help you speak English with greater clarity and confidence. If you want to get that raise, land that promotion, speak up in meetings, or ace your next job interview, register now. Heather is amazing, and I can highly recommend her programs. Find out more and sign up here »

 

Just for Fun – Word Stress Quiz

Article from Heather Hansen

Here are a few funny phrases I pulled from an email I recently received. Can you read these sentences correctly on the first try? Enjoy!

  1. The farm was used to produce produce.
  2. The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.
  3. The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.*
  4. Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.
  5. I did not object to the object.
  6. The insurance was invalid for the invalid.
  7. I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

Here are the answers:

  1. The farm was used to produce produce.
  2. The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.
  3. The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.
  4. Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.
  5. I did not object to the object.
  6. The insurance was invalid for the invalid.
  7. I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

*If you have trouble remembering the difference between spelling desert (n. hot and baren landscape, v. to run away from, leave) and dessert (n. yummy treat, usually including chocolate), my mom taught me a great trick when I was little: “We always want more dessert, so we add an extra s!”
 

All articles are copyright © Shirley Taylor. All rights reserved. This information may not be distributed, sold, publicly presented, or used in any other manner, except as described here.

Permission to reprint all or part of any article in your magazine, e-zine, website, blog or organisation newsletter is granted, as long as:

  1. The entire credit line below is included*.
  2. The website link to www.shirleytaylor.com is clickable (live)**.
  3. You send a copy, PDF, or link of the work in which the article is used when published.

This credit line must be reprinted in its entirety to use any articles by Shirley Taylor:

* Credit line:
© 2013 Shirley Taylor.
Shirley Taylor is a recognised leading authority on business writing and communication skills. For almost 30 years she has presented keynotes and training programmes that help people and organisations boost communication skills and develop great relationships both orally and in writing. Shirley is bestselling author of 12 books, including Model Business Letters, Emails and Other Business Documents, which has sold half a million copies worldwide and has been translated into many languages. If you would like Shirley to speak at your next event, visit www.shirleytaylor.com.

** The above website link to www.shirleytaylor.com must be clickable to receive permission to reprint the article.